City Lit Blog

Classics Day 2015 - The naked truth: beautiful bodies in the classical world

Story added 19th Feb 2015

The naked truth: beautiful bodies in the classical world

Our annual Classics Day will take a fascinating look at portraiture and the representation of the human body in the classical world. 

This year's event is the perfect introduction to ancient Greek art, ahead of The British Museum's major exhibition 'Defining Beauty - the body in ancient Greek art', opening later in March.

Classics Day is a partnership between City Lit, The British Museum and University College London.

Book your place online now or call us on 020 7831 7831

 

Date and venue

7 March 2015, 9:30am

The British Museum, BP Auditorium

Book your place now

 

Prices

Full fee: £40

Senior/Members of the British Museum: £40 
Concessions: 
£32 

 

Event programme

09.30

Registration

10.20

Welcome by Mark Malcomson, Principal of City Lit

10.30-11.15

Appearances of the body in Roman literature– Gesine Manuwald, University College London

11.15-12.00

“Over my dead body”: physical representations of heroism and death in the Iliad – Antony Makrinos, University College London

12.00-12.30 Coffee break

12.30-13.15

The depiction of sport in ancient Greece – William Sterling, City Lit

13.15-14.30 Break

14.30-15.15

“Just as a craftsman… overlays silver-ware with gold, she adorned his head and shoulders with an added beauty” – Michael Duigan, City Lit

15.15-15.45 Coffee break

15.45-16.15

Plenary session and conclusion

 

Details of the talks and biographical notes

Appearances of the body in Roman literature

This talk will discuss the wide range of comments on the body in Roman literature, from the beginnings until the imperial period. It will consider a variety of examples such as descriptions of beautiful bodies, philosophical considerations on the relationship between body and soul and the advice of health writers. This will lead to conclusions on Roman views on the body.

Gesine Manuwald is Professor of Latin and Head of Department in the Department of Greek and Latin at University College London (UCL). Her research interests include Roman epic, Roman drama, Roman oratory and the reception of classical antiquity, especially in Latin literature of the Renaissance; she has published widely on all those areas.

“Over my dead body”: physical representations of heroism and death in the Iliad

Information about the talk will be added shortly.

Antony Makrinos is Lecturer in Classics at University College London. His research interests include Homer, scholarship in Byzantium (esp. reception of the Homeric text with emphasis on allegorical interpretation) and the modern reception of Homer.

“Just as a craftsman… overlays silver-ware with gold, she adorned his head and shoulders with an added beauty”: Greek images of beautification display constructiveness and deceit

Information about the talk will be added shortly.

Michael Duigan teaches Classical and Ancient History at the City Lit. For many years he lectured in the Certificate/ Diploma in History of Art course at Birkbeck. He delivered a course in the ‘Classical Tradition’ at St Mary’s University and on the ‘Classical Artist’ at the Courtauld Institute. He also teaches a Summer School on Ancient Art in Oxford University. Michael acts as a tour guide to archaeological sites and museum collections. He is presently completing his thesis on how the Greeks understood the activity of art making.

The depiction of sport in ancient Greece 

Information about the talk will be added shortly.

William Sterling has lectured in Adult Education for 15 years and has a wide range of interests from the Classical World through the Anglo-Saxons to the Enlightenment. He runs regular one day courses at the City Lit covering various aspects of the British Museum’s collections.