Nationalism and national identity in a global perspective

Course Dates: 04/10/19 - 22/11/19
Time: 10:15 - 12:15
Location: KS - Keeley Street

What does being a citizen of the world mean? Is this possible at all? How do concepts such as citizenship and cosmopolitanism fit into our discourses on nationalism and national identity? This course will explore both theories and practices of nationalism and national identity in a comparative, global perspective.

Description

What is the course about?

What does being a citizen of the world mean? Is this possible at all? How do concepts such as citizenship and cosmopolitanism fit into our discourses on nationalism and national identity? This course will explore both theories and practices of nationalism and national identity in a comparative, global perspective. We will look at what the key debates and theories surrounding nationalism are and how these contribute to or contest ideas and articulations of national identity. The course’s focus will range from a Western European tradition of nationhood, to ‘small-nation’ secessionist movements both in Europe and elsewhere, as well as postcolonial complications with nation-states.

By using a mix of theory, media and case studies, the course will look to foster debate and discussion around varying conceptualisations of nationalism and national identity. We will challenge those definitions which we normatively hold by virtue of each having our own specific identities.

What will we cover?

We will look at what the key debates and theories surrounding nationalism are and how these contribute to or contest ideas and articulations of national identity. The course’s focus will range from a Western European tradition of nationhood, to ‘small-nation’ secessionist movements both in Europe and elsewhere, as well as postcolonial complications with nation-states.

These may include:
-The Basque Country
-Catalonia
-Scotland
-Nigeria/Biafra
-Kahsmir/India
-Kurdistan/Iraq.

What will I achieve?
By the end of this course you should be able to...

-Identify core theoretical and conceptual ideas underpinning the practice of contemporary nationalism and national identity.
-Analyse critical primary and secondary texts in these areas
- Have a strong comparative grasp of the topic
-Apply these political theories in discussions of a broad international context.

What level is the course and do I need any particular skills?

An introductory course, no previous knowledge required.

How will I be taught, and will there be any work outside the class?

The course will be delivered through a mixture of tutor presentations, class discussions, and student presentations. There will be some recommended reading for outside of class, which will enhance your enjoyment of the discussions.

Are there any other costs? Is there anything I need to bring?

Pen and Paper for note taking. Copies of the readings will be provided by the tutor.


General reading List:

- Ernest Gellner (1981), ‘Nationalism’, Theory and society., 10:6, pp. 753-776

- Anthony Smith, National Identity, London, 1991. Introduction only.

- John H. Elliot, Scots and catalans : union and disunion. (Yale, 2018). Introduction

- Eric Hobsbawm, Nations and Nationalism since 1780, Cambridge, 1992. (Modernist)

- Anthony Smith (2009), Ethno-symbolism and nationalism: a cultural approach. London: Routledge, pp.1-41

- Steven Grosby, (2003) “Religion, ethnicity and nationalism: the uncertain perennials of Adrian Hastings”, Nations and nationalism,9:1, pp. 7-13

- Partha Chatterjee (1993) The Nation and its Fragments : Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Introduction

- Anthony Marx (2002), ‘The nation-state and its exclusions’, Political science quarterly. 117: 1, pp. 103-126

- Thomas Nail, “The Figure of the Migrant” (Interview), http://www.critical-theory.com/the-figure-of-the-migrant-an-interview-with-thomas-nail/

- Rana Dasgupta, “The Demise of the nation state”, https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/apr/05/demise-of-the-nation-state-rana-dasgupta

-Lyndsey Stonebridge, (2018) Placeless People: Writings, Rights, and Refugees. Introduction

- Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni, (2009) “Africa for Africans or Africa for “natives” only? “New Nationalism” in Zimbabwe and South Africa”, Africa Spectrum, 44;1. pp. 61-78.

When I've finished, what course can I do next?



General information and advice on courses at City Lit is available from the Student Centre and Library on Monday to Friday from 12:00 – 19:00.
See the course guide for term dates and further details

Reviews

Book your place

Course Code: HPC03

Fri, day, 04 Oct - 22 Nov '19

Duration: 8 sessions (over 8 weeks)

Full fee: £149.00
Senior fee: £119.00
Concession: £66.00

Or call to enrol: 020 7831 7831

Download form & post

Any questions? humanities@citylit.ac.uk
or call 020 7492 2652

Please note: we offer a wide variety of financial support to make courses affordable. For more information visit our online Help Center. You can also visit the Information, Advice and Guidance drop-in service, open from 12 – 6.45, Monday to Friday.