The Dis/united Kingdom: the relationship between the Four Nations, 1801-1998

Course Dates: 11/05/21 - 06/07/21
Time: 15:00 - 16:30
Location: Online
Tutors: 
England dominated the United Kingdom from its formation (1801). The course explores how each of the other territories retained/developed a sense of national identity - from culture to terrorism- together with the government’s role and response.
This course will be delivered online. See the ‘What is the course about?’ section in course details for more information.
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In stock
SKU
171068
Full fee £139.00 Senior fee £111.00 Concession £61.00

Course Code: HBH47

Tue, day, 11 May - 06 Jul '21

Duration: 9 sessions (over 9 weeks)

Or call to enrol:020 7831 7831

Please note: We offer a wide variety of financial support to make courses affordable. Just visit our online Help Center for more information on a range of topics including fees, online learning and FAQs.

What is the course about?

Adopting an episodic/outline approach, the course considers the various forms of national identity and aspirations to be found in Ireland, Scotland and Wales during these years together with, where appropriate, the British government’s response. Aspects covered include the importance and role of culture in developing/sustaining such awareness in the ‘peripheral nations’ as well as the more formal political movements/goals and the means adopted which aimed to change the nature of England’s control (as they saw it) over their lands.

This is a live online course. You will need:
- Internet connection. The classes work best with Chrome.
- A computer with microphone and camera is best (e.g. a PC/laptop/iMac/MacBook), or a tablet/iPad/smart phone/iPhone if you don't have a computer.
- Earphones/headphones/speakers.
We will contact you with joining instructions before your course starts.

What will we cover?

From the ballot to the bomb: the many forms of Irish political nationalism, 1801-1922
From Young Ireland to WB Yeats: culture and Irish nationalism from the mid 19th to the early 20th centuries
Ulster Unionism as British loyalism and nationalism: some examples

From the United Scotsmen to the National Association for the Vindication of Scottish Rights (1790s-1850s)
The campaign for Scottish Home Rule and the emergence of Scottish National political parties (1886-1945)
Scottish nationalism and British politics, 1945-1999

The cultural medium of Welsh nationalism and the challenge to (the) English in the 19th and early 20th centuries
The campaign for Home Rule and the emergence of Welsh National political groups and parties (1890s-1945)
Welsh nationalism and British politics, 1945-1999.

What will I achieve?
By the end of this course you should be able to...

Identify and discuss: the various forms of national identity and aspirations to be found in Ireland, Scotland and Wales during these years together with, where appropriate, the British government’s response; the importance and role of culture in developing/sustaining national awareness in the ‘peripheral nations’; the more formal political movements/goals and the means adopted which aimed to change the nature of England’s control (as they saw it) over their lands.

What level is the course and do I need any particular skills?

An introductory course: no previous knowledge is required.

How will I be taught, and will there be any work outside the class?

The course will be delivered through a mixture of formal input and discussion with student participation encouraged. No work outside class is required.

Are there any other costs? Is there anything I need to bring?

No other costs; requisites for optional note taking.

When I've finished, what course can I do next?

Other courses in British and European history. Please see the website.

We’re sorry. We don’t have a bio ready for the tutor of this class at the moment, but we’re working on it! Watch this space.