US controversies: Cuba and the United States

Course Dates: 05/03/22
Time: 10:30 - 16:30
Location: KS - Keeley Street
Tutors: 
In 2019, sixty years after Fidel Castro's rebel army overthrew an American-backed dictatorship, the US and Cuba are at a cross-roads: the Castro era now over; the Trump administration threatening to return to a Cold War footing. This one day course will reveal how we got here — via sugar cane fires and exploding cigars. It will use photography, film clips and primary sources to bring to life the stories that made that that history — and to ask, what happens next? Tutor: Jack Gain.
This course takes place in the classroom, please follow this link to find out what we are doing to keep you safe: Staying COVID-19 secure at City Lit
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183289
Full fee £59.00 Senior fee £47.00 Concession £30.00

Course Code: HAH37

Sat, day, 05 Mar - 05 Mar '22

Duration: 1 session

Or call to enrol:020 7831 7831

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What is the course about?

Over sixty years after Fidel Castro's rebel army overthrew an American-backed dictatorship, the US and Cuba are at a cross-roads. The Castro era is over; the American administration changiing its position over recent years. This short course will reveal how we got here — via sugar cane fires and exploding cigars. It will use photography, film clips and primary sources to bring to life the stories that made that that history — and to ask, what happens next?

What will we cover?

- "An apple waiting to fall..." — the US and Cuba in the long run.
- "They can win..." — the causes and events of the 1959 revolution.
- Land, heath and literacy — the first priorities of the revolution.
- "One minute to midnight..." — the Bay of Pigs, the Missile Crisis and the Cold War.
- "A campaign of propaganda, economic sabotage and infiltration..." — US subversion in Cuba, Cuban subversion abroad.
- "History will absolve me." — the Castro era in perspective.
- What happens next?
______________________________________________________________________________.

What will I achieve?
By the end of this course you should be able to...

- Understand how the US and Cuba have shaped each other’s histories.
- Discuss the causes of conflict between the two countries since the revolution of 1959.
- Discuss the prospects for the revolution’s survival and for an improvement in relations between the two sides.

What level is the course and do I need any particular skills?

This is an `introductory` course and does not assume any previous study or reading although you will need a good grasp of English to keep up with the course. You will gain more from the course, in terms of enjoyment and learning, if you are able and willing to do some supplementary reading. As with most of our history and current affairs courses, an open mind and a willingness to listen to and think about views with which you do not always agree are more important than specific levels of skills.

How will I be taught, and will there be any work outside the class?

This is a short course featuring lectures, activities, film clips and group discussion. There is nothing you need to do to prepare, but there will be recommendations for further reading after the class.

Are there any other costs? Is there anything I need to bring?

No additional costs. If you would like to take any notes, do bring some pen and paper with you to class.

When I've finished, what course can I do next?

For other courses in American or Contemporary history, please see the college website: www.citylit.ac.uk.

Jack Gain Tutor Website

Jack Gain teaches courses on Latin American history and US foreign policy at City Lit. After becoming interested in Latin America at university, he went on to complete a Master's degree in Latin American Studies at the School of Advanced Study in 2010. His personal involvement in solidarity activism led him to focus on the Central American solidarity movement of the 1980s. His dissertation on that subject was specially commended by the judges of the Blakemore Prize. "Latin America was the place where the US first projected power beyond its own borders. It's not a region that we learn much about at school here in the UK. But its history gives us a uniquely insightful way of understanding US foreign policy — as well as being fascinating in its own right." Jack's teaching at City Lit focuses on the ways in which US foreign policy and domestic politics overlap and on bringing to life the voices of those overlooked by conventional histories. "Studying history gives you a powerful tool for understanding the world around you." Away from City Lit, he also works in the Library at Queen Mary University of London as a library assistant and writing tutor.

Please note: We reserve the right to change our tutors from those advertised. This happens rarely, but if it does, we are unable to refund fees due to this. Our tutors may have different teaching styles; however we guarantee a consistent quality of teaching in all our courses.