Women's prize for fiction

Course Dates: 24/07/21 - 31/07/21
Time: 10:30 - 13:30
Location: Online
The Women’s Prize for Fiction is one of the most popular, contentious and highly contended literary prizes in Britain. In this short course we will read and discuss past and current winners, texts by the 2021 judges, consider the merits and drawbacks of the prize, and perhaps predict the next winner!
This course will be delivered online. See the ‘What is the course about?’ section in course details for more information.
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SKU
184440
Full fee £69.00 Senior fee £55.00 Concession £42.00

Course Code: HLT240

Sat, day, 24 Jul - 31 Jul '21

Duration: 2 sessions (over 2 weeks)

Or call to enrol:020 7831 7831

Please note: We offer a wide variety of financial support to make courses affordable. Just visit our online Help Center for more information on a range of topics including fees, online learning and FAQs.

What is the course about?

This online literature weekend course considers the history and often divisive nature of the Women’s Prize and the popularity or cultural impact of its past winners. Through engaging with other media such as interviews and podcasts, we would consider what the judges look for in a winner, how the judges themselves are chosen, the transition of the award from the Orange Prize to Women’s Prize and compare shortlists from previous years to the overall winners. Other topics for discussion would include the recent controversy regarding the ‘Reclaim Her Name’ campaign, the merits and drawbacks of categorised prizes and the difficulties in assessing who qualifies for them.

Tutor biography:
Beatrice Ashton-Lelliott is a PhD researcher and seminar tutor in English Literature at the University of Portsmouth. Her doctoral thesis examines the autobiographies of nineteenth-century magicians and representations of fictional conjuring in Victorian literature. She also worked on the British Library’s ‘In the Spotlight’ research project, contextualising nineteenth-century playbills and periodical reviews. Her other research interests include contemporary Japanese literature, occulture, Romanticism and fantasy fiction.

This is a live online course. You will need:
- Internet connection. The classes work best with Chrome.
- A computer with microphone and camera is best (e.g. a PC/laptop/iMac/MacBook), or a tablet/iPad/smart phone/iPhone if you don't have a computer.
- Earphones/headphones/speakers.
We will contact you with joining instructions before your course starts.

What will we cover?

• The history/development of the Women’s Prize
• Reactions to the ‘Reclaim Her Name’ campaign and current debates about the pros/cons of the prize
• The themes of past and current winning texts in the lead up to the 2021 award.

What will I achieve?
By the end of this course you should be able to...

• Engage with the history and processes behind British literary prizes
• Have an awareness of any themes or styles which recur in winners of the prize
• Confidently discuss the merits and drawbacks of the prize.

What level is the course and do I need any particular skills?

This course is for anyone interested in the subject. We will discuss a wide variety of genres and the processes behind literary awards, so an interest in or awareness of the Women’s Prize and the texts which have been nominated would be beneficial.

How will I be taught, and will there be any work outside the class?

Some short contextual lectures with PowerPoints, but this course is primarily an interactive mix of large group work and discussion with some smaller group discussions in breakout rooms. Work outside class is reading the set texts and any necessary secondary reading. Clips from podcast and video interviews will be shown throughout.

Are there any other costs? Is there anything I need to bring?

Please buy: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo (2019, Penguin)

Extracts of a selection of books which have previously won the prize, as well as some of the shortlisted ones for this year will be provided by the lecturer. Digital materials and/or links to any additional secondary reading will also be provided.

When I've finished, what course can I do next?

Look for other literature courses at www.citylit.ac.uk/history, culture and writing/literature/fiction.

Beatrice Ashton-Lelliott

Beatrice Ashton-Lelliott is a PhD researcher and seminar tutor in English Literature at the University of Portsmouth. Her doctoral thesis examines the autobiographies of nineteenth-century magicians and representations of fictional conjuring in Victorian literature. She also worked on the British Library’s ‘In the Spotlight’ research project, contextualising nineteenth-century playbills and periodical reviews. Her other research interests include contemporary Japanese literature, occulture, Romanticism and fantasy fiction.

Please note: We reserve the right to change our tutors from those advertised. This happens rarely, but if it does, we are unable to refund fees due to this. Our tutors may have different teaching styles; however we guarantee a consistent quality of teaching in all our courses.