City Lit Blog

City Lit response to government Careers Strategy

Story added 5th Dec 2017

 

The government's Skills Minister, Anne Milton, has released the long-anticipated Careers Strategy at the CDI annual conference in Birmingham.

The strategy outlines a number of proposals as part of the government's aim to ensure young people can acquire the skills they need to thrive in the modern workplace. It also suggests improved pathways to help better support learners applying for vocational and technical education routes.

Key announcements in the strategy include:

  • A £4m investment in training and support to 500 schools and colleges to ensure every institution has a dedicated careers leader.

  • £5m funding towards developing 20 dedicated careers hubs in disadvantaged areas, linking together schools, colleges, universities and local businesses.

  • Specialist support provided by the National Careers Service to help the long-term unemployed and those with additional needs (planned for October 2018)

  • Local Industrial Strategies to bring together local partnerships and relationships with businesses, Mayoral Combined Authorities and LEPS to make sure careers advice is well positioned to aid local economic growth.

You can read the full report here - Careers strategy: making the most of everyone’s skills and talents

Unveiling the strategy, Skills Minister Anne Milton said:

“Our modern Industrial Strategy is about building a Britain fit for the future by investing in the development of skills to meet the changing needs of business, increase productivity and drive growth across the whole country.

“It is vital, in an environment where new industries are emerging and many of the most important jobs of the future don’t yet exist, that individuals have access to high-quality labour market information and earnings data to underpin their choices.”

Responding to the strategy, Phil Chamberlain, Executive Director of External Engagement, said:

“It is important for the government to recognise the existing issues with social mobility in the UK, and respond to the fact that the working world is changing. The jobs market has changed considerably over the last decade, and we believe all workers need to be professionally equipped to thrive as the demands of employers change with the rise of new industries and technologies. At City Lit, we already see hundreds of students every year taking on new learning opportunities to retrain, upskill and become more versatile in an increasingly changeable jobs market.

“The measures outlined by the Skills Minister this week are welcome; however we hope closer attention will be paid by all parties into how lifelong learning opportunities can help solve the UK’s social mobility and productivity challenges.”